Career Resources

  • The primary reason for physician turnover is poor cultural fit, and when thinking through this phenomenon, it shouldn’t come as a surprise. On the contrary, first interviews generally last no longer than a day-and-half and second interviews may last two days with a preponderance of the time dedicated to searching for a home.

  • Download a copy of the latest Resident Reach Jobs Magazine.

  • Download a copy of the October Resident Reach Jobs Magazine including a copy of the September 19, 2013, article, “Clinical Practice: Carotid Stenosis," as it appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine.

  • The ever-changing digital environment makes it possible for physicians seeking a practice opportunity to quickly identify open positions and define their search to include specific criteria such as region, employment model, practice setting, and subspecialty expertise.

  • Contracts: Understanding your status as a scarce commodity in constant demand leaves maintaining a work-life balance completely up to you.

  • Download a PDF copy of the 2013 Specialty Delivery special issue!

  • If your employment is contingent upon being able to admit, treat, or operate on patients within a hospital setting or you are accepting an employed position with a hospital, you need to review the hospital’s medical staff bylaws and rules and regulations.

  • As telemedicine sites and networks grow, so do novel practice opportunities for physicians in both rural and urban areas

  • Download a PDF copy of the 2013 In Practice 4-5 special issue!

  • Download a PDF copy of the 2013 In Practice 2-3 special issue!

  • Earnings are increasing modestly, but a few specialties are seeing big hikes and others, flattening incomes.

  • Although a vast preponderance of all contracts will provide fringe benefits, did you know that physicians are generally treated differently than other groups of employees, including executives, who in some instances may have commensurate salaries?

  • Download a PDF copy of the 2013 February Resident Reach issue!

  • Health reform and hospitals' changing needs spur continued evolution — and new career opportunities — in this fast-growing physician sector.

  • If your recruitment promises are not reflected within your contract, your employer is not legally obligated to follow-through on any agreement, in particular those initial recruitment discussions.

  • Women physicians are making significant inroads in to the medical and surgical specialties, and now constitute a rapidly increasing contingent in many of the traditionally male-dominated fields. Despite these gains, the paucity of women in leadership positions, particularly within academic medicine, as well as persisting pay inequity, indicate that challenges remain.

  • The purpose of this article is to mitigate any unwanted surprises through an increased comprehension of the common contractual covenants that are typically overlooked and may hinder your departure from an employment setting. These items – malpractice insurance, upfront money, and non-compete language – should be closely examined and negotiated in a manner that mutually benefits both parties.

  • Digital technology has been a boon in expediting communication for both physicians seeking a practice opportunity and recruiters making connections with candidates. Even though it’s tempting today to dash off an inquiry or response in a matter of seconds, physicians should slow down, craft an intelligible message and, ideally, give it a second review and count to 10 before pushing the send button.

  • This article highlights the most prevalent compensation models, their advantages, and the potential disadvantages. The nomenclature may change from location to location; however, the premise behind each model and the potential areas of concern remain consistent.

  • Physicians who choose military practice often discover that their options – in practice settings, geographical locations, and even the range of patients and conditions they treat – are more varied than they expected. These benefits, in conjunction with myriad leadership opportunities that military medicine offers, factor into many physicians’ decision to remain in the military after their required service period ends.